South America Post 9 … Waterfalls!

Our next destination was Iguacu Falls which mark the border between Brazil, Argentina (Iguazu). Both sides are worth seeing, so we were spending one night on each. They had had unseasonably heavy rain which was set to continue, so we knew we were in for 2 very wet days!

We flew into the local airport in Brazil, which didn’t inspire confidence!

It was being rebuilt. Subsequently, the equivalent local airport on the other side, in Argentina looked the same. A huge case of keeping up with the Jones’ maybe!!

Staying in an agri eco hotel meant a cabin in lovely gardens, and fresh organic food.

And we saw our first Toco Toucan! The Guiness variety!Gorgeous bird.

Next morning we visited the Parque des Aves, which was next to our eco hotel. It is a conservation project which rescues injured or sick wild birds of Brazil, and rehabilitates them, and runs breeding programmes for endangered species. A great way to get a close up view of birds we had seen at a distance, as we walked through huge, high aviaries.

Then onto the falls. The rain had started, but it did not spoil the falls! In fact, the volume of water was so huge, the spray was soaking everyone anyway.

These falls comprise over 200 separate waterfalls, stretching literally for miles, plunging down into the river below.

We took a path and walked alongside them, then out over one cascade into the spray and wind generated by another! The noise was indescribable.

Then, in an act of madness, we decided to go on a high speed rib ride. There was a choice of the dry ride – viewing the falls from a distance, or the Wet ride, which would take us under…. not behind, under the waterfall! Well, we were already wet!! Leaving everything dry in a locker we set off, whizzing and bouncing over white water to the foot of the falls.

From here, the power was visible everywhere around you. Then, the boat turned and we went under. It was one of the smaller falls, but the force of the water hitting your head was huge. It took your breath away. He took us in and out 3 times, then we sped back… sodden but feeling rather chuffed we had done it! Not surprisingly, my phone was not out taking photos!!

Back to the lodge where we changed, collected our bags and took a taxi to Argentina and our Air BnB, the Secret Garden. 3 simple rooms at the bottom of a very verdant garden! The owner, John Fernandes, was a famous photographer, but was sadly ill in hospital. We were well looked after by his friends, including Caipirina cocktails and nibbles on the terrace before we headed out for dinner!

I had booked The Argentinian experience some months ago, due to it’s great reviews. It was fab! A group of us were taught how to make Argentinian cocktails, told about the history the food, and the amazing steaks, made our own empanadas, and treated to a 4 course meal that was really delicious, including a divine, and huge, fillet steak each.

Argentinian wine accompanied each course (sadly not for me as I still cannot drink wine), but Chris loved it, especially the Malbec. We slept well!

Next day we went to the Argentinian side of the falls, which were equally good. A series of walks give you a different perspective, and a mini train ride takes you out to the river that feeds the waterfalls. You walk across 1km of bridges to the Devils mouth, where one of the biggest concentrations of water pours down. On both sides of the river. Unbelievable!

The magic was enhanced by many hundreds of Great Dusky Swifts whirling and swirling up and down in the spray. Unbelievably, they nest on the rocky face behind the torrent. Magical!

Coatis prowl everywhere, ready to pounce on a discarded sandwich. Although cute, apparently they have a bad bite.

It had been a wonderful few days, and we were awestruck by the power of these amazing falls. Sadly, time to leave, as we were off to the airport for our flight to Buenos Aires!

South America Post 8 Rio de Janeiro

From lush greenery and peaceful bird filled mountains, we took connecting flights via Bogota to Rio de Janeiŕo. We flew in over the huge bay, at 5.30am on a cloudy rainy morning. We had just 1 night in Rio so had to make the most of our time here, despite a serious lack of sleep. We got to our hotel, the lovely Ipanema Inn, at 8.20 am. Our guide Marcio, who I had found on TripAdvisor, arrived at 8.50! The rain stopped. “Come on”, he cried, “I have booked the train up the mountain to see Christ the Redeemer!”. We sped off in his car, driving past sandy Ipanema beach and then the more touristy Copacacbana beach, which still had some sand sculptures from Carneval. As we drove, Marcio shared his wealth of knowledge about the history and culture of Rio.

The girl from Ipanema, who inspired the song, is apparently still alive and in her eighties! Each neighbourhood has it’s own pattern of mosaic pavements

The cloud was slightly higher, but then a sudden rain shower would explode from the sky. We caught the funicular train up the 2,400 foot Mount Corcovado expecting to see very little. As we reached the top, the clouds parted, and there it was. The 100 foot high statue that has looked benevolently down at Rio from on high since 1931.

Its arms span 92 feet and had to be built without scaffolding! It is impressive, and a close look shows it is covered with a mosaic of soapstone tiles. The view is amazing, although Rio’s other famous high point, the Sugarloaf mountain, remained shrouded in cloud.

Also through cloud we saw the famous Maracana football stadium which holds the record for the largest attendance at a football match… 200,000 who watched the Unthinkable. Uruguay beat Brazil in the World Cup Final in 1950. Apparently the end of the match was characterised by stunned silence!!

Rio the city has a population of 6.4 million, and it threads it’s way between many high, forest clad mountains, a fact we had not appreciated. Many parts are white, highrise blocks, or houses, which contrast with the distinct, large, lower rise clusters of reddish buildings, which are the Favelas, there are over 100 of these districts in Rio.

Favelas are historically where the poorer people live, and their key feature is that the people ‘squatted’ on the land, built a shack there, and then, after a certain number of years, gained the right to the land. Many of them built upwards, one room at a time. The favelas are mostly in less desirable parts of town, often climbing up mountainside, with just paths, not roads, although one ended up surrounded by grand buildings, and the land is worth a lot! Favelas were dangerous places, where cartels and gangs ruled, but a recent police initiative has apparently improved things in some of them. Favelas were also home to the Samba, and most dance schools are still located there. Marcio drove us through a favela as we went to Barra, a beautiful beach, which hardly anyone goes to because there aren’t enough bars and restaurants, and for the Brazilians, beach going is a big social event!

We visited Parque Lage , now a national park, a garden designed for a French family in 1840 by English landscape designer John Tyndale. He used local rainforest plants, but incorporated the very Victorian features of follies and grotto, complete with fake stalactites!!

The house was lovely, with Christ the Redeemer towering behind it, and is used as an arts centre. On to Leblon, a lovely beach area, for lunch at a Kilo restaurant.

A huge serve yourself buffet, where your plate is weighed at the end, and you pay per gram! Desserts too!

Fun and delicious! Then, as we walked and drove, Marcio pointed out beautiful churches, art deco buildings, museums, schools and military buildings, and the stunning theatre colon, many in grand architectural styles with heavy Spanish influence.

He explained how different groups had colonised the city over time, each bringing their culture and food. Tapas from the Spanish, different grains and breads from the native people . After Marcio left us, we walked on Ipanema beach under dramatic skies, and paddled in the south western Atlantic Ocean!

Then a fabulous supper at Zaza’s Bistro, and we collapsed into bed at 10.00!

Next day, Marcio was back at 8.00am! We headed straight to Sugarloaf Mountain. So lucky. Today this was in clear sky, but Christ the Redeemer was completely hidden.

Two cable cars take you up 2000 feet to a great viewpoint over the bay, city and beaches.

We then witnessed a miraculous apparition!!

Then, we were taken to the centro, business district where modern skyscrapers mix with old streets and churches. The modern cathedral is, well, weird! Meant to represent a modern take on Mayan architecture, to us it was ghastly from outside, but strangely peaceful within, and holds 20,000 people!

In contrast, we went to the Sao Bento church, built around 1600 as part of a monastery. It was stunning.

Then we visited the famous tiled steps, created gradually by artist Escadaria Selaron, who lived in a house on the steps.

He became obsessed with his task, tiling the side walls as well, often with tiles from all around the world, sent by visitors. Sadly, a few years ago, he committed suicide on the steps, but they are hugely popular, (especially apparently since Snoop Dog visited!), and serve as his rather bizarre memorial.


A quick dash back to collect our cases, then off the the airport by 1.30!! We loved Rio, and, thanks to Marcio, saw an amazing amount in our short visit here!!